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Bio 11 SS July 24

Biology 11 Lesson Outline                                      Date July 24 th

 

 

Last lessons Objectives

 

 

Plant Physiology Evaluation
Today’s Objectives Plant Reproduction (Angiosperm and “where is the gamete)

Animal introduction

 
Topic

Number One

Pistils, Carpels and double pollination, oh my

Seeds

http://extension.psu.edu/business/start-farming/vegetables/factsheets/seed-and-seedling-biology

 

 
Topic

Number Two

Animal Game plan Quiz

Virus

Three Porifera and Cnidaria

 

 

Test

DNA, Taxonomy and Evolution

Debrief and new topic Porifera and Cnidaria Quiz  
Text Book

 

Class Notes

   
Gunner Notes Eight phylums is three ½ days

Day one: Porifera and Cnidaria

Day Two: Worms (Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Annelida

Day Three: Molusca and Arthropoda

Day Four: Echinodermata

 

Then

Chordata and Evolution

 

 

 
You tube Reference    
Today’s flow pattern How does shape and size of a single cell relate to how it lives?

How does the immune system adapt to larger organisms invading the host?

How do single cell organisms adapt to their environment in relation to how they reproduce, get food and adapt to change in environment?

How does sexual reproduction increase diversity within a kingdom?

What is the role of water in regards to single cell organisms?

As an organism becomes multicellular, what are some advantages and problems with getting larger?

How are life cycles linked to evolutionary success of both single and multicellular organism?

What are some preconceptions linked to the words plants?

 

 
Take Home Message  

 

posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Lesson Outline and have No Comments

Lower Plant Review Sheet

 

Lower Plant Review

 

Plants in general

 

  • Alternation of generations is defined as the switching back and forth between ___ and ____.
  • What does asexual reproduction not provide?
  • Is alternation a change in ploidy of cell or going from sporophyte to gametophyte?
  • What process makes spores?
  • What generations makes gametes?
  • What structures do all plants have?

 

Algae

 

  • What would be one effect on the global ecosystem if algae died off?
  • What is the relationship between algae and chlorphyll?
  • What are some examples for algae for moving onto land (think of seaweed and tides)
  • Taxonomically speaking, what are the three types of algae?
  • What is the dominant generation in algae?
  • Algae absorb carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nutrients directly from _____
  • In regards to lower plants, what are some adaptions to land?

 

 

Mosses

 

  • What are some examples of moss moving onto land ( moss are pioneer species)
  • What are two functions of moss “leaves”
  • Why are moss found in damp or wet environments?
  • How is water transported through moss?
  • What is the dominant generation in moss?
  • What generation and ploidy are the moss you see while walking through the woods.
  • Do moss have “rhizoids”?
  • What is unique about moss and their sporophyte and gametophyte generations?
  • Can you label a diagram of a moss?
  • Where are sperms made in moss?
  • How could you identify the sporophyte generations in moss?
  • Why are most good for sterilizing and healing wounds.
  • How are moss related to coal?
  • How does moss used to make Scotch?

 

 

Ferns

 

  • What are some examples of how ferns have successfully moved onto land
  • How do ferns prevent them selves from self-ferilization?
  • What are two functions of a sporangium?
  • Compare and contrast the gametophytes of mosses and ferns (describe one similarity and one difference between the two)
  • What is the dominant generation in ferns?
  • In ferns, what is the function of antheridia and archegonia
  • In ferns where are spores made and by what process?
  • Although ferns are “true” land plants, they require water for what process?
  • Where are sperm made in fern?
  • What system do ferens have that moss and algae do not have?
  • When we see ferns during a walk through a forest, which generation are we looking at?
  • Why do ferns grow taller than algae and moss?
  • What structures of a fern have been used in salads and by indigenous people

 

posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Science 10 and have No Comments

Bacteria review

 

Acme Review for Virus, Immune and Bacteria Test

 

Virus

 

  • How are viruses classified?
  • What are the structures of a bacteriophage?
  • What are the structures within a retrovirus?
  • How do you identify the difference between viral capsid and viral envelop?
  • What type of viral cycle make makes cancer?
  • When is a virus virulent?
  • What is a retrovirus and how does it work?
  • What happens in a lytic cycle of a virus?
  • What happens in a latent cycle of a virus?
  • What happens in a mutagenic cycle of a virus?
  • In animal viruses the viral envelope is made of what?
  • What is a prophage

 

 

Immune system

  • What are examples of nonspecific defenses in your body?
  • What is a humoral response?
  • What is a cell mediated response
  • What is the difference between a T Cell and B Cell?
  • How is HIV related to T helper cells?
  • Why do pharmaceutical companies have to keep creating new flu vaccines?
  • How does a vaccine work?
  • How does the immunes system work against viruses?
  • How does the immune system work against bacteria?
  • What is the difference between passive and active immunity?
  • Can you use antibiotics against a virus? Why?
  • What is a monoclonal antibody and how can it be used?
  • How is a plasma cell related to a memory cell?

 

 

Bacteria

 

  • How are bacteria (eubacteria) classified?
  • What are bacteria that can survive without oxygen?
  • What is a chemosynthetic bacteria and how could it be identified?
  • What are two properties of all monera?
  • What is prokaryote and what features do they have?
  • What is a whip like structure used for locomotion in bacteria?
  • What is a saprophyte?
  • What are the differences between fermentation and cellular respiration?
  • An organism that produce it’s own food is called what?
  • Rod shape bacteria are called what?
  • In a diagram, can you explain primitive sexual reproduction in a bacteria?
  • Most bacteria reproduce by what process?
  • What is an endospore and how does it work?
  • Why has the classification of kingdom Monera switched into Archeo, Eubacteria and cyanobacteria?
  • New stem cells research is now inserting DNA into bacteria, why could this be both good and bad?
  • If you were infected by a gram negative bacteria what would you be prescribed?
  • If you were infected by a gram positive bacteria what would you be prescribed?
  • Explain four reasons why bacteria can be helpful to humans?
  • What is the difference between an antiseptic and a disinfectant?
  • If a chemical is released by a bacteria and it is then denatured by heat and then injected into a host, it is called what?
  • What does a vaccines made of ?
posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Notes and have No Comments

Bio 11 SS July 20 2017

Biol 11 SS Lesson July 20 th 2017

 

 

Last lessons Objectives

 

 

Protist Evaluation
Today’s Objectives Plant Reproduction (Angiosperm and “where is the gamete)

 

 
Topic

Number One

Protists to Plants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MS9P1DNAsUc

 

Crash course

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAR47-g6tlA

 

Protists video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNsFk2OZi3Q

 

 

 

Parasitic Protist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QdVVC3MjCc&list=PL37GBC2Awuxhe3eED8wsxUXzC9YAx0Iim

 

 

Types of reproduction with protists

 

 

Protist Qz
Topic

Number Two

Plant movement of water (from ocean to land and fresh water)

 

Computer criteria

Font Tahoma or veranda 12 pt.

Justified

1.5 spacing

 

Mission : What is a seed?

 

Select a seed type

Picture (s) of seed

Diagram of a seed

 

Report on:

·      What it looks like

·      What are the human usages of the seed?

·      How does a seed work?

·      What are the parts of a seed?

·      What is inside of a seed (molecules)?

·      What makes a seed grow?

·      What is germination?

·      What affects seed growth rate?

 

Crash Course

Alternation of generation in nonvascular plants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWaX97p6y9U

 

Interpreting Alternation of generation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ7mnrELMGg

 

 

Quiz

Virus

Three Vascular plants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9oDTMXM7M8

 

Movement of water in plants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rK2DIF_tgCg

 

Osmosis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zuNMVzTeCtw

 

 

Water Potential

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDZud2g1RVY

 

Plant transport and metabolism

Bozeman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsY8j8f54I0

 

Plant reproduction ( Algae to Angio)

Role of :

1.   Alternation of Generation

2.   Water

3.   Wind

4.   Insects

5.   Fruit

 

Gymnosperm Reproduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqGhmkYXcdM

 

Plant Germination

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TE6xptjgNR0

 

Plant reproduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExaQ8shhkw8

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExaQ8shhkw8

 

Angiosperm Reproduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ycl2E9r-_o

 

 

Plant movement of water

 

 

Pistils, Carpels and double pollination, oh my

Seeds

http://extension.psu.edu/business/start-farming/vegetables/factsheets/seed-and-seedling-biology

 

 

Test

DNA, Taxonomy and Evolution

Debrief and new topic    
Text Book

 

Class Notes

Drawing magnification video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElpshkF5oAc

 

 
Gunner Notes Looking at the cladogram on the board.

·      How does the role of water change in plants in relationship to reproduction and plant structures linked to photosynthesis?ruc

·      How could a leaf “talk” to a root?

·      In plants, how do single cells diversitfy to tissues and organ and or organ systems?

·      What are some sames for these structures?

 

 

 
You tube Reference    
Today’s flow pattern How does shape and size of a single cell relate to how it lives?

How does the immune system adapt to larger organisms invading the host?

How do single cell organisms adapt to their environment in relation to how they reproduce, get food and adapt to change in environment?

How does sexual reproduction increase diversity within a kingdom?

What is the role of water in regards to single cell organisms?

As an organism becomes multicellular, what are some advantages and problems with getting larger?

How are life cycles linked to evolutionary success of both single and multicellular organism?

What are some preconceptions linked to the words plants?

 

 
Take Home Message What spreads “cell “ information in plants? What would a plant “cell “ phone be?

 

posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Lesson Outline and have No Comments

Bio 11 SS July 19th 2017

Bio 11 SS Lesson 10                                      Date July 19 th

 

 

Last lessons Objectives

 

 

1.   Microscopes and exploring bacteria to protist

2.   Linking protist and fungi to plants

The notion being a plant

Evaluation
Today’s Objectives 1.   What is a plant? (Photosynthesis to algae)

2.   Aquatic plants

3.   Planting a seed (lab)

Topic

Number One

Review of bacteria vocab.
Topic

Number Two

Protists to plants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-6dzU4gOJo

 

Cladogram of Protist to Plants

http://isite.lps.org/sputnam/Biology/U8%20Classification/U7_Notes.htm

 

Key Concepts and Ted talk clips

 

1)   Cellular verses noncellular

Bacteria communication

https://www.ted.com/talks/bonnie_bassler_on_how_bacteria_communicate?language=en

 

Super bugs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikZQPB45Zbw

 

Protist Power

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZS3MH79-AY8

 

 

2)   Comparison of Protist strategies to be a parasite or a mold

 

Parasitic Protist

https://www.biologycorner.com/bio1/parasitic-protists.html

 

Autotrophic: Plant or animal?

 

Heterotrophic

How to digest “food”

 

Life cycles and parasites

Plasmodium

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoIO-g1hiSo

 

Switch strategy..

 

Protists to fungus

http://study.com/academy/lesson/fungus-like-protists-characteristics-types-examples.html

 

 

 

What are the advantages of going from single cell to multicellular?

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/where-animals-come-from/

 

Mold and origin of plants verses fungi

Video of slime mold

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B79Z56vl02A

 

Slime mold film clips

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkVhLJLG7ug

 

How smart are slime?

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/brainless-slime-molds/

 

Vocab

cytoplasmic streaming

 

Sexular Spores and multicellular as new strategies

 

What is a plant?

http://www.qrg.northwestern.edu/projects/marssim/simhtml/info/whats-a-plant.html

 

Quiz

Virus

Three Territory to recon for next class

See above cladogram and web reference

 

·      Endo symbiosis and chloroplast

·      Photosynthesis

·      Stereo types about plants

For notes on plants, search “Botany”

 

 

Test

DNA, Taxonomy and Evolution

Debrief and new topic Next class, Quiz on micro,immune and virus

Exploring plants

 

Text Book

 

Class Notes

Chapter on Protist

Chapter on Aquatic plants

Gunner Notes Which has killed more humans, Viruses or Bacteria?

Can you find evidence to support your point of view?

 

What structure in a phytoplankton would make a fossil record?

 

Biology Corner is a great website for all things biology. It is a source for good AP notes and it is easy to use.

Practice test are also found here.

 

Practice vocab quizzes

 

https://quizlet.com/3145397/viruses-and-bacteria-vocabulary-flash-cards/

 

https://quizlet.com/11380661/biology-bacteria-and-viruses-flash-cards/

 

 

 

 

You tube Reference Crash course Archea to Protist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAR47-g6tlA

 

Today’s flow pattern How does shape and size of a single cell relate to how it lives?

How does the immune system adapt to larger organisms invading the host?

How do single cell organisms adapt to their environment in relation to how they reproduce, get food and adapt to change in environment?

How does sexual reproduction increase diversity within a kingdom?

What is the role of water in regards to single cell organisms?

As an organism becomes multicellular, what are some advantages and problems with getting larger?

How are life cycles linked to evolutionary success of both single and multicellular organism?

What are some preconceptions linked to the words plants?

 

Take Home Message Water is for the glue..and Carbon dioxide for the sugar back bone.

Where the salt goes, the water flows.

 

posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Lesson Outline,Botany and have No Comments

Bio 11 SS Bacteria Vocab

Bacteria Vocab List

 

1. Aerobic  
2. Anaerobic  
3. Anaerobic respiration  
4. antibiotic  
5. Antitoxin  
6. Autotrophic  
7. Bacillus  
8. Binary Fission  
9. Blue green algae  
10. Cell wall  
11. Chemosynthetic  
12. Chemotaxia  
13. Chemotherapy  
14. Cocci  
15. Conjugation  
16. Endospore  
17. Fermentation  
18. Flagella  
19. Heterotrophic  
20. Pathogen  
21. Penicillin  
22. Photo taxis  
23. Photosynthetic  
24. Pplo  
25. Respiration  
26. Rickettsia  
27. Spirochetes  
28. Staphylococci  
29. Streptococci  
30. Streptomycin  
31. Toxin  
32. Vaccine  
posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Notes,Micro Bio,Microbio and have No Comments

Bio 11 SS Test One Review questions

Good news…only multiple choice and or true or false.

Only on Taxonomy, Scientific method and Five Kingdoms.

 

Test One Review:

 

Content: Scientific Method, Taxonomy and Five Kingdoms

 

Taxonomy

  1. A binomial name or scientific name consist of a _____ followed by the _____.
  2. Which is capitalize?
  3. Species are classified based upon what factors?
  4. Would you classify an organism based upon it’s evolutionary relationship? Why or why not?
  5. Starting from Kindom to genus and species, how would you classify a human?
  6. K, P, C,O, F, G, S ( Know each step)
  7. What is the correct order of organisms starting from the most diverse to the most specific?

 

There are four theories (posted on the board)

  1. Which discusses cells but not their metabolism?
  2. Which discusses the genetic code and how it is displayed?
  3. Which discuss the opposite of abiogenesis?
  4. Which discusses and provides a mechanism for changes with time?

 

Five kingdoms

  1. A prokaryote is a cell without a nucleus. Which two phyla could be part of this group beginning with M.
  2. Moss and Ferns belong to which kingdom?

 

Scientific Method

  1. Is a hypothesis a tentative explanation of a result or an observed phenomena?
  2. What is the distinction between a theory, law or principle?
  3. Starting with an observation, what is the order of inquiry to make a theory?
  4. Science is many things including many terms such as an understanding of nature, explored through experimentation and even subject peer review in journals, can conclusions of these labs change?

 

  1. The way in which scientist explore the natural world is through a set of steps know as the _____.

 

  1. Within each hypothesis are two word, if and then and these two terms refer to the independent and dependant variable. What is the role of a control?

 

  1. Where would a scientist publish or discuss results of an experiment?
  2. Which is more “true” a law or a theory? Why?

 

  1. A hypothesis can be used both in science and within moral or ethic debates, which is testable?
posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Lesson Outline,Biology Eleven Notes and have No Comments

Bio 11 Animal Exam Review sheet

Bio 11 Study Guide for Chordata

Some links to help you.

 

Notes

https://www.biologycorner.com/bio2/notes_chordates.html

 

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/classes/biol/1030/rajamani/Topic%2016%20BIOL1030NR.pdf

 

http://www.anselm.edu/homepage/chieber/itopic10.html

 

 

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOn_oIX_l9U

 

Fish

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNlQzE5QVoo

 

Amphibians

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2i8zPRLf-c

 

 

Reptiles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4Xrq_xCC50

 

Aves

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOlGsH-ZpOo

 

How birds fly

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3So7OMwNgy8

 

Avian respirations

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWMmyVu1ueY

 

Mammals

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57JNJEjaDVE

 

mammal evolution

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kZVPpMxyI8

 

Chordates (in general)

  1. How are chordates classified?
  2. What are the 4 characteristics of all chordates?
  3. Which two groups of chordates do not appear to show all the characteristics of a chordate?
  4. The adult seasquirt (Urochordata) has only one characteristic of chordates. What is it and why is a seasquirt still considered a chordate?
  5. Do all chordates have backbones?
  6. Which invertebrate group is linked to all chordates?
  7. Which chordate group is thought to be the earliest
  8. Of all the chordates, which has the most diversity?
  9. Which chordate group has the largest range of habitats?

Urochordata

  1. Where would you assume you would find the first chordate?
  2. What is the common name for urochordates?
  3. What is a “tunicate”?
  4. Why is a “sea squirt” called a sea squirt?
  5. If filter feeding was the first type of feeding for invertebrates, what do you suppose would be the first chordate feeding mechanism be?

Cephalochordata

  1. Why is a British Medical journal called and how is it linked to cephalocordates?
  2. What is the latin translation for cephalochordate?
  3. What characteristic do cephalocordates have that are common to all chordates?
  4. Do cephalocordates have backbones?
  5. Does the larvae of a cephalochordate the same as the adult?
  6. How does a lancet feed it’s self?

Agnatha

  1. What structure is missing in this group of fish?
  2. What is the distinction between a lamphrey
  3. Molusca have a radula, what do agnatha have and why?
  4. Are agnatha found in both marine and fresh water environments?
  5. What is the difference between a lamprey and a hagfish?
  6. Do these fish have hair?
  7. Which agnatha produces large volumes of slime? Why?

 

Chondrichthyes

 

  1. What sort of bones to sharks have?
  2. What sense is the strongest in chondrichthyes?
  3. What is the difference between in vivo and in vitro?
  4. What is viviparous and omnivorous?
  5. What type of scales do sharks have?
  6. How are sharks scales linked to how knights held onto swords?
  7. Why are shark fins a popular food source in some cultures?

Osteichthyes

  1. How do fresh and marine fish differ in regards to how they excrete nitrogen waste?
  2. How many chambers does a fish heart have?
  3. What sort of scales do bony fish have?
  4. What are the challenges of living in either fresh or marine environments?
  5. Do fish sleep?
  6. What group of fish has the most diversity in species?

Amphibians

 

  1. How do amphibians breath?
  2. How many chambers do amphibians have in their hearts?
  3. How is this linked to how amphibians breath?
  4. What is the advantage of having metamorphosis in frogs?
  5. Why are amphibian good ecological indicators?
  6. Can amphibians hibernate? Why?

 

Reptilia

  1. What are the traits of snakes, lizards and turtles that make them a reptile and not an amphibian?
  2. What is an amniotic egg and what are the parts of an amniontic egg?
  3. How are yolk sac, allantois, chorion and amnion linked to reptilian reproduction?
  4. How do reptiles survive being an “ectotherm”?
  5. How does laying on a hot rock assist with reptile digestion?
  6. What are three adaptions of reptiles to move onto land?
  7. Can a reptile be a hermaphrodite or can it change it’s sex?

Aves

  1. What is a characteristic that is shared both with reptiles and birds?
  2. Why do birds have two sets of lungs?
  3. What is a feature of avian anatomy that only birds have?
  4. Are birds the only animals that have beaks?
  5. How many types of feathers do bird have? Why?
  6. What is the advantage of birds being “warm blooded”?
  7. What is the distinction between a solid and hollow boned bird?
  8. Was the first bird solid or hollowed boned?
  9. What are the structures of a “breathing egg” and what do they do?
  10. Why do birds such as a chicken have a fused pelvis and spine?
  11. Do birds have large bladders?

 

Mammalia

 

  1. What are the characteristics of a mammal?
  2. How could a whale be related to a human?
  3. What type of animal did early mammals evolve from?
  4. How are the three “groups” of mammals classified?
  5. Can a mammal lay eggs and sharp webbed claws?
  6. What are the three characteristics of Class Mammalia?
  7. What three strategies do mammals have for reproduction?
  8. The mammalian umbilical cord has evolved from which two parts of a reptilian egg?
  9. Are marsupials only found in Australia?
  10. What is a placenta and how is it linked to how long a female has their young inside of them?
  11. Why would the excretory system of an aquatic mammal be different than a mammal found in the desert?

 

posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Lesson Outline and have No Comments

Biology 11 Mission Vertebrate Assignment

Mission Vertebrate:

 

Greetings Biology eleven students

 

Your mission is to select a specific species of chordate and create an entertaining and factual power point much like the one’s your instructor has shown this year. While this is a challenging endeavor, it will help you to both review and show academic wisdom about the phylum Chordate.

 

Step One:

You are to work on this mission either by your self or one other person. No groups of three!

Step Two:

Select one specific chordate and do not do an animal that has already been chosen. Remember that we do have three chordates in the room that would appreciate some attention!

Step Three:

Gathering both image and factual content, you will need to discuss 10 key topics about your organism.

  • Background information:
  1. How does your animal fit into taxonomy of chordate
  2. Show example of similar and different animals linked to your animal
  3. Show a cladogram of where your animal fits into all chordates.
  • Discuss body plan of your organism.
  1. Compare unique features of your organism to similar species.
  2. Discuss unique physical adaptions linked to body plan. (For example: limbs, fins, fur, scales)
  • Feeding
  1. What features does your organism have linked to eating?
  2. Where on the food chain is your organism?
  3. Does your organism eat all the time?
  4. Can you include video clips of your organism eating?
  • Respiration
  1. Discuss both how your organism gets oxygen and releases carbon dioxide.
  2. What structures are linked to your organism respiration?
  3. Can you show a video or image?
  4. What sort of circulatory system does your organism have?
  5. How is your organism’s circulatory and respiratory systems linked to the habit that your organism lives in?
  • Excretion
  1. What structures are linked to your organism’s removal of metabolic waste?
  2. What type of nitrogen product does your organism make and why?
  3. How does your organism keep water balance?
  4. How is the habitat your organism lives in linked to excretion?
  • Response
  1. How developed is your organism’s responses to stimuli?
  2. Which is the strongest and weakest sense?
  3. Can you provide a video clip of sample behaviours?
  4. Can you provide a comparison of your organism’s brain and senses to other linked and not linked chordate?
  • Movement
  1. How does your organism move?
  2. What structures are linked to your organism’s movement?
  3. Video clip of movement?
  4. What adaption has occurred to facilitate your organism’s movement?
  • Reproduction
  1. How does your organism reproduce?
  2. Do you have a life cycle of your organism?
  3. What structures are linked to your organism regarding (eggs, placenta)
  4. Is your organism’s young born inside or out side of the female?
  5. What is the duration for embryo development?
  6. What unique reproductive behaviours are linked to your organism?
  7. Does you organism have unique reproductive structures?
  • Populations and group behavior
  1. Does your organism live alone or with a group?
  2. What is the name of a group of your organisms called?
  3. Does your organism have unique group behaviours such as migration or “pack” behavior?
  • Ecology and link to Humans
  1. Discuss how your organism “fits” into ecological levels of interactions
  2. Discuss the positive and negative interactions between your organism and other organisms (both animal and plant)
  3. How is your organism linked to human populations?
  4. Is your organism an endangered species and if so, how or what could be done to limit your organism extinction?
  5. Why did you pick your organism
  • That is so cool category
  1. Has your organism been in popular social media?
  2. Has your organism been a movie or TV character?
  3. What are some amazing “facts” that have not been mentioned?

Criteria

  1. Your “slides” should show a uniform pattern regarding both colour and font size (need to be able to read from the back of the room.
  2. You should include: pictures, diagrams, life cycle, and video content.
  3. For your power point, you should be prepared to possibly present your information.

 

  1. You will need to include both an introductory title page with your organism’s binomial and generic name. You will also need to include the date and your name (s)
  2. The final slide (s) should include a detailed bibliography of all your data used in your power point.
  3. You are to hand in a simple written “reflective response” which should include: some of the challenges of the assignment, what you found interesting, what you “learned” that was related to the years content and validation for what mark you feel you deserve.

 

This assignment is due on the last official class of Bio 11.

No late assignments will be marked. No excuses!

 

May you succeed and enjoy your mission.

posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Lesson Outline and have No Comments

Bio 11 Essay Assignment

The Bio 11 Essay Assignment:

 

Your mission is to take a quote about life and then link that quote to either six activities of life or six big ideas. This is a means to bridge science with day-to-day references about life.

 

Sample Paths to follow: “The academic path”

 

  • Select a quote

“ Life is not an exact science, it is an art”

  • Decide if you want to support the quote or challenge it.
  • Outline your essay

 

Challenge or support quote:

Arguments:

 

Support quote:

 

  1. Quote was written in late 1800’s when biology was natural history.
  2. Many biological theories and or facts are found by luck.
  3. Science begins with observation, so does art
  4. Both art and science are means of interpreting what is in front of your eyes.
  5. “Art provides what nature cannot”

 

Or

 

Challenge Quote:

 

  1. Biology is becoming more “scientific” with better mean of interpreting biochemistry, anatomy and remote sensing.
  2. Life has a pattern and theories such as evolution.
  3. Life has activities of life.

 

4)

Make a brief Outline Essay

 

  • Introductory paragraph:
    1. Quote
    2. If life is an art verses an exact science then how do activities of life show this?
    3. Pair activities: Locomotion and Metabolism, Reproduction and Growth, Response and repair.
    4. Which path of argument to follow

 

  • Paragraph 2: Metabolism and locomotion
    1. Every living thing needs energy to move either large structures like limbs or even fluids within tissues.
    2. How much movement and energy that is needed is not an exact amount.
    3. A dancer may need more energy that another form of artist. Each day offers a different challenge so sometimes energy is stored or an organism may stay in one place.
    4. Can measure both activity and caloric intake and yet it is not always exact.

 

  • Reproduction and Repair
  1. Reproduction can involve both sharing of genetic information and dividing   your own information.
  2. An artist may share ideas or work on their own. Growth can happen quickly or over a long time.
  3. Exact growth can be measured and yet many variables can affect it.
  4. Reproduction is not always predictable and may have behaviors such as spiders that seem both odd and artistic

 

  • Response to stimuli and repair.
  1. Some time one gets lost in their thoughts and ideas chasing an artistic idea and forgets to look up.
  2. Slow response to stimuli to response time and now you body needs to repair scraped skin.
  3. More advanced cephalization allows for better way to adapt to stimuli which may mean less repair

 

  • Conclusion:
  1. Issue with exact is difficult because life is always changing
  2. Artist may be able to adapt and perform in the moment much like simple living things.
  3. In all activities of life, there is an unknown outside the realm of exact numbers and formula.
  4. “Art provides what nature cannot”

 

 

Plan B: Fun path to follow “ Confusion is the sign of growth”

 

Premise: Biology big ideas and life as a student

 

Introduction:

In high school, each student attempts to adapt and learn new things each day. Like science, we observe and attempt to make sense of things that do not seem to make sense. Perhaps by looking at big ideas of biology, one can see that “wisdom of insecurity” may be a way to calm confused thoughts.

 

  • Two ideas: Change and continuity
  1. In biology change with time is evolution and continuity is about exchanging genetic material.
  2. In high school, students evolve from dazed grade eights to focused grade 12’s.
  3. There is always “drama”. Is the “drama” due to adaption or wrong genetic pairings? Is the confusion due to misinterpreting the data?
  • Two ideas: Diversity and interactions
  1. In biology diversity and unity is how living things are different and similar due to genetics, species formation and reproduction.
  2. In high school there are “clichés” which some time interact in both positive and negative fashions.
  3. In high school some students are attempt to adapt and yet they may not know how to interact.
  4. Sometime failure to interact or accept one’s own diversity may lead to confusion and yet you can change with time and grow from the experience.
  • Homeostasis and structure and function
  1. In high school you attempt to seek balance and yet practical experience may not be there.
  2. In biology, living things maintain “balance” by increased cephalization or new structures to adapt to situations and yet sometimes, dogs bark simply because they do not know what to do.
  3. The only way to learn about balance is to experience unbalance.

 

Conclusion:

  1. Both in biology and in high school, students are told a lot of information. Sometimes it makes sense and other times, you really have to wonder where algebra and life connect. Confusion is an attempt to make sense of the nonsensical. A student learns to adapt and overcome life situation and that is growth. Likewise, every living thing is responding to stimuli and hopefully the response works. If it does not work, then there is always another chance.
  2. Use six big ideas to validate how each day in high school is an attempt to make sense of the nonsensical and so there is growth (an activity of life)

 

 

Take home message:

 

  • Some times you have to translate information from one venue to another. It is important to be able to show literacy by being able to link your ideas with others.
  • I am not an English teacher, and yet I write stuff every day. I am not concerned about you linguistic skills sets or your panache to baffle me with large volumes of bovine feces. Keep run on sentences to a minimum. Use the occasional comma and period and check your spelling.
  • This challenge is to be evaluated on your ability to reflect upon either your own experience or with things that you have learned this year. Try to seek positive paths and enjoy the experience. If you show that you have taken the time to think and your writing shows that you have given 100% then your mark with reflect that.
posted by Marc Bernard Carmichael in Biology Eleven,Biology Eleven Notes and have No Comments